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Grilling Tips for Sue.
















Here are some grilling tips for Sue.
I hope these help. WE no longer salt steaks, as my husband is on a very low salt diet. Even without the salt, he loves his rib eyes!
Robbie IN

Season early — You should salt your meat even before you start your coals. If you throw salt on right before you put it on the grill you end up leaving salt all over the grill, not on your steak. So season your steaks about fifteen minutes before you put them on the grill. That gives the salt a chance to dissolve and evenly flavor your meat. Sea salt is all the rage now and chefs like to fancy up a plate by using specialty salts like Hawaiian Pink Salt or Fleur de Sel. Sometimes a little good salt is all that a steak needs.

Take your steaks out early — Let your steaks sit at room temperature for at least twenty minutes. I know it doesn’t seem sanitary, but since steaks are whole muscles and you are cooking the outside well above safe levels, you won’t need to worry so much about food-borne illness. The problem with throwing your steaks on the grill right out of the refrigerator is that it will take them a lot longer to cook. Steaks at room temperature take seasoning better and will cook faster.

Crack Your Own Pepper
Pepper not only adds an element of spice to steak, it also adds crunch. You want a combination of fine, medium, and big pieces. To achieve this, pour whole peppercorns in a resealable plastic bag and crush them with a heavy skillet.

Build a Two-Zone Fire
ou want a hot side to sear the meat and a not-so-hot side to finish the cooking. If you've got a gas grill, that's easy: Keep one burner on low while the others go full blast. If you're cooking over coals, use your tongs to build a ramp of embers climbing up to one side of the grill to create high-low control.
Feel the Heat

How do you know when the coals are ready? Once the flames have died down and the coals are glowing orange, use the 2-2 rule: Put your hand two inches above the hottest part of the coals. If you can hold it there for two seconds—no more, no less—you're good to grill.

Control Flare Ups
Dripping fat + hot coals = scorched, carcinogenic steak. Don't use a sprits bottle of water to douse the flames—you'll kick up ash. And putting the lid on the grill won't smother the fire fast enough. To get that rib eye out of harm's way, gently slide it to a flare-free area with tongs until the fire subsides. (If you throw the meat around, you'll shake out more fat and start another fire.)

Use Real Charcoal
Hardwood lump charcoal burns hotter and faster than manufactured briquettes. It doesn't matter if you use oak or mesquite, as long as it looks like it came from a tree and not construction scraps. You want your steak to taste faintly of smoke, not chemicals.




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